Conservation Through Knowledge and Awareness

The Amboseli Trust for Elephants aims to ensure the long-term conservation and welfare of Africa’s elephants in the context of human needs and pressures through scientific research, training, community outreach, public awareness and advocacy.

PROGRAM


ATE's science, outreach and advocacy.

AMBOSELI & US


Amboseli Trust for Elephants Team, Project History and Ecosystem Background.

RESOURCES


Films, books and scientific publications from the Amboseli Elephant Research Project.

Note from the Director

Introduction

Thank you for showing an interest and concern for elephants by opening our website. The Amboseli Trust for Elephants’ aim is to learn everything we can about these intelligent, complex and often mysterious animals while at the same time assuring that they have a peaceful and secure future.

I started the Amboseli Elephant Research Project along with my colleague Harvey Croze in 1972. We chose Amboseli because the elephants were relatively undisturbed in the sense that they were not fenced in, were still moving freely in the ecosystem, and were not being heavily poached. What we wanted was to gather base-line data on the biology of a “natural” population. Most important we wanted to study elephants by following individuals over time. More than 40 years later we are following some of the same individuals we met back in 1972 as well as all the Amboseli elephants that have been born since we started. Much of what we know today about wild African elephants is based on our study.

Join us to learn about these amazing elephants and to follow along with us as we watch their lives unfold.

Cynthia Moss
Director and Founder

Articles

    ATE Statement on tusk removal

    ATE Statement on tusk removal

    23 November 2014

    A question we are often asked: why not saw off the tusks of elephants in order to save them from poachers? 

    There are many compelling reasons why it would not be practical, economical or ethical to immobilize every elephant to cut off its tusks.

     

    ATE Statement on Circus Elephants

    ATE Statement on Circus Elephants

    20 November 2014

    Having worked with elephants in the wild for over 4 decades, we believe ATE has a very good understanding of what is it that elephants need in order to live out their lives in a happy and humane manner. This statement highlight why we do not condone elephants being used in circuses as well as certain captive environments. 

“Elephants form deep bonds with each other, which last for decades. Elephant survival is strongly affected by access to the social and ecological knowledge that older elephants hold; where to go, what to eat, how to avoid danger.”
- Dr. Cynthia Moss